Features

International Women’s Day

Published on: 8th March 2018

By Sabine Kurz
Communications and Events Assistant, The Farr Institute
Sabine.Kurz@ed.ac.uk

On this year’s International Women’s Day, we’re highlighting some of the female researchers working at all four of our Centres.

Scroll through the gallery to hear from even more women working at The Farr Institute:

 


Clair Gamble is a PhD student at the University of Dundee. She’s looking into applying contemporary methods of measurement in the assessment of dementia knowledge and attitudes across populations.

  1. Had you always wanted to pursue a career in this field?

No. I was originally a musician, then went on to do a nursing degree. After working across clinical settings, I gained an interest in dementia care and began to explore approaches to improve the quality of life and care for people living with the condition.

  1. What do you enjoy most about what you do?

The freedom combined with the responsibility of working on my own project is something I hadn’t experienced before. A PhD is truly owned by the student and this brings a real passion and determination to do it well. It’s really gratifying to see the pieces of the puzzle coming together.

  1. What advice or inspiration would you give to young women who are thinking about a career in STEM?

Take inspiration from the many extraordinary women in STEM who are breaking down societal barriers. Never compare yourself to others. A career in STEM will allow you to network with people whose skills compliment yours; build on this for real strength.

Set your own limits, then break them!

 


Hannah Lennon is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Manchester. As a statistician, she develops and applies statistical models to health and medical data to uncover patterns in diseases, for example identifying the associations between obesity and cancer.

  1. Had you always wanted to pursue a career in this field?

I have always enjoyed maths but at one point I wanted to study to become doctor.

  1. What do you enjoy most about what you do?

I get to research medical sciences while doing maths and statistics. I most enjoy that I am constantly learning and becoming involved in very different health-related projects. One of the best parts of working in science is the excitement of finding something new, reproducible and real, and that what you do may contribute to our understanding of health and disease.

  1. What advice or inspiration would you give to young women who are thinking about a career in STEM?

One of the most important things is to decide what you want to do. Focus on applying for roles that you are interested in, not the roles that most students with similar backgrounds go for. Oh and go for it!

 


Sarah Fox is a Patient and Public Engagement and Involvement Officer at the Health eResearch Centre (HeRC) in Manchester, part of The Farr Institute for Health Informatics. She acts as a bridge between the centre’s researchers, patients and members of the public.

  1. Had you always wanted to pursue a career in this field?

Until last year I spent most my time huddled in a cramped lab with no windows working as a systems neuroscientist – researching how our brains process the sensation of touch. But I’ve always come to life when talking to people about science, what it is and why it’s so important, so moving into engagement and involvement felt like a natural side step.

  1. What do you enjoy most about what you do?

I get to be a fly on the wall, listening and learning about a huge range of research projects. It’s absolutely fascinating to learn about such diverse and important work, then to help distil the essence of these projects into something anyone can connect with. I also love working with such fascinating people, you can’t underestimate the insight and depth patients and members of the public bring to this field– when partnerships are managed correctly the output can be amazing.

  1. What advice or inspiration would you give to young women who are thinking about a career in STEM?

It’s not just for someone else! If you have a spark and you enjoy STEM take the leap and give it a try. I can’t lie, it’s hard work but also immensely rewarding and it can lead you down a huge range of exciting career paths.

 


Michaela James is a researcher at Swansea University and manages a physical activity intervention to get teenagers more active in Swansea.

  1. Had you always wanted to pursue a career in this field?

I kind of accidentally fell into this field after doing my masters degree here at Swansea University. I had always loved being in academia as a student and jumped at the chance of doing it as profession – I feel like my route into research has been a bit of divine intervention and I am very happy about it.

  1. What do you enjoy most about what you do?

I love being able to make a real difference in a field I am incredibly passionate about. Physical activity has always been a huge part of my life and to be able to influence the way it is delivered in Wales is an amazing opportunity.

  1. What advice or inspiration would you give to young women who are thinking about a career in STEM?

Don’t be intimidated by how STEM is often perceived. I spent too long believing I was not ‘smart’ enough to be in this job and not considering the strengths I do have that would make me a good researcher. Everyone is capable of great things if you have the nerve to pursue them. Be brave!


Back to top+